541-787-4395 kristen@kristenoneillart.com

Upcoming Events – October 2015

Hi there! Here are the currently scheduled upcoming events for me this season. Art Along the Rogue October 3 & 4, 2015 Free to attend Art Along the Rogue Come downtown Grants Pass and see me and 36 other artists do chalk street paintings on the ground as you watch. This is a street painting and music festival that started in 2003. This years theme is Cartoons Meet the Masters. All artworks are started and completed (I hope!!) during the weekend and are temporary. Come see them while they last! Artoberfest October 16-18, 2015 Southern Oregon Guild of Artist and Artisans Free to attend. Located on Highway 199 in Kerby, Oregon. About 30 minutes from Grants Pass. Friday: noon to 5pm, Saturday 10-5, Sunday 10-4. A great place to see lots of local artists and artisans gathered together selling their work. Awesome place to go pick out a unique gift and meet the artists face to face.   Ongoing Are you interested in commissioning a piece of artwork from me? I do offer this service! Please feel free to contact me to discuss details. Some general things to keep in mind: I do paintings. While I am capable of a wide variety of mediums, I do paintings. I do landscape paintings. I do landscape paintings that look like my landscape paintings.  🙂 I want you to be happy with the end result, so we are going to discuss lots of things up front. If you aren’t quite sure what you want, that is fine, but we need to figure out exactly what you want before my brush touches the paint....

Plein Air: Part Two!

It is amazing what you can learn from someone else. Here I had just written on why I felt guilty about not doing my paintings “plein air” style (on location) and I wasn’t sure why. Then last Saturday morning I attended a plein air demo and talk by our event juror, Mike Hernandez. I AM SO GLAD I WENT. As soon as he started talking I reached into my purse looking for paper to write his words of wisdom down on. I found a receipt from my gas station coffee purchase. This receipt is now covered on both sides with little frantic notes. Mike spoke about color theory and how he feels that shadows are still warm colors (it’s not just me?!). He spoke about how the blue of sky effects the color of the grass and how the canopy of the trees blocks that blue a bit and so under the tree the color you use should be less blue, not more. He spoke of color relationships, of really looking at what you are studying, not just “knowing” that the tree is green. He spoke and showed us how to mix dozens of different greens (heaven on earth for this lady!). And the most important thing he said (for me) is that the camera makes a choice. We can see so much more then our cameras, but when we take a photo the camera chooses the hue, chroma, and lightness. Later on if you increase the saturation you are just increasing the camera’s choice you can’t bring back what it discarded. He also gave me a personal critique...

Plein Air

I am asked constantly if I paint on location, or plein air, as it is often called. “Um, no…” is often my answer, and for some reason I feel completely guilty about it. Maybe it started when I first heard someone say that they can tell the difference in work that was painted from a photo or painted from life. But, whatever it is, I immediately launch into excuse mode, “I can’t do that because I have young kids,” or “I spend a lot of time at the site, before I go back to the studio.”  Recently I had caught onto my behavior and decided “enough is enough!” And I signed up for a plein air event. I have had so much fun! Well, the first two days. On the third day, today, I had to paint at a farm, which is good for traditional plein air painters, but for my style it didn’t quite jive. I was describing my trouble to my husband, that many plein air art is subtle in color and deals with atmospheric perspective, and slight changes of color and shape, sweeping vistas, or calm scenes and my work is more like Emerill Lagasse shouting “Bam!” But yesterday I was at a beautiful location that just spoke to me in a thousand ways. I did my first “real” plein air painting. I spent six hours on location. I dealt with the color changes as the hours passed, clouds and rain rolled in and out. Rocks got wet, dried out, got wet again. I was unprepared for rain, and fashioned myself a little “painting fort” by...