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Gardening: Spring is Sprouting

Gardening: Spring is Sprouting My onions are sprouting and I have begun transplanting them into the new garden. I love onions and put them in just about everything I cook. Unfortunately I can’t remember which flat is the red onions and which one is the white. But that is a problem that will solve itself, right? (A toddler decided to play with my seedling tags, any guesses who that was?) My girls and I have planted two different kinds of peas so far. When I read the package I realized they are shorter peas, so my mental picture of the great-pea-and-bean-fort-of-2016 will probably have to wait until next year. I love reusing old egg cartoons to start my seedlings. Transplanting them into the bed gets a little wobbly so perhaps I’ll try putting them into egg shells propped up in the egg cartoon next time. I’ve also direct sowed bok choy, spinach, two kinds of carrots, green onions, artichokes (I have no idea what will happen there!) and two kinds of lettuce. Of course I forgot to mark which one was where, figuring “I’ll remember”. Um, yep, not so much. I guess I’ll turn it into a vegetable identification moment with my oldest daughter. My youngest daughter has discovered the joys of the watering can and will water anything. Including what you don’t want watered, like the driveway. Overall we are on our way to being able to get food we’ve grown ourselves. It is important to me to teach my kiddos where food comes from, the joys of gardening, working to get something you want and to have super...

About Canvas and What You Should Know Before You Buy!

My Love Affair with Canvas is Back On! For the last few months you may have noticed that I have been painting on wood panels. I have been exploring options after switching from oil to acrylic paints. I have missed canvas and decided with my last order of art supplies (I miss having a local art store!) to order all canvas. There is a certain glee I get with owning a roll of canvas. It dates back to the time I went with my high school art teacher to the art store and bought an entire roll of canvas and then got to unroll the whole thing down the school hallway. Pre-Stretched verses Artist-Stretched Canvas There are many pre-stretched canvas options for artists. I prefer to avoid these options unless I am buying it in person and can do a close inspection of the corners, make sure the canvas is taut, there are no dents, and make sure there is no warping. I would say only a 5% of the time have I bought pre-stretched. I also prefer to have heavy-duty stretcher bars and pre-made often use a lower quality stretcher bar. My worst canvas pet-peeve is staples on the side of the stretcher bars. Why? It forces you, the owner of the painting, to frame it instead of leaving you the option to show the sides of the canvas and just hang it on your wall. Some artists paint the sides with the image and many times printers give you this option. This is often called “gallery wrap,” but really gallery wrap used to mean that the canvas...

Endangered Plants – Threatened by the LNG Pipeline

Edit March 11, 2016: The Jordan Cove LNG terminal project has been rejected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission! This beautiful flower is an endangered species called the “Gentner’s Fritillary”. It lives here in Oregon and is one of four endangered species that will be “adversely affected by the pipeline” according to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. There are currently only 1,200 plants in existence. The “pipeline” is the Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) 36″ wide, 232 mile pipe that will transport Canadian and Rocky Mountain LNG (from fracking) across Oregon and to a port in Coos Bay for exportation. The pipeline is scheduled to go under two major rivers (the Klamath and the Rogue)! Construction of the pipeline would impact approximately 4,523 acres of vegetation. This would consist of 2,882 acres of forested lands, 643 acres of grasslands/shrublands, 103 acres of wetland/riparian areas, and 896 acres of agricultural areas. Of the forested land crossed, about 821 acres of late-successional old-growth, 821 acres of mid-seral, and 1,240 acres of clear-cut or regenerating forests would be impacted.  (FERC report) The “Pacific Connector” is require to develop a “Federally-Listed Plant Conservation Plan” to address the 4 critically endangered species that it could potentially eliminate. I have been unable to find the Conservation Plan. If anyone knows anything about this plan please let me know. My assumption is that they are still trying to create one. Let’s make sure it actually happens! See a map of the proposed pipeline according to the Pacific Connector website: http://pacificconnectorgp.com/maps/   Follow me here: Share this...