kristen@kristenoneillart.com

Oregon Coast Trail series

For years I have been painting hikes. My new series, Oregon Coast Trail, a small step in a new direction of painting a hike that I didn’t take. My hiking buddy, Pete Miller, hiked the entire 382 mile trail in 21 days this summer. (Wow, right?) As he hiked he sent me photos. The First Part of the Series In my first set of paintings I painted as he hike. Everyday I opened up my email to find a new set of photos, I’d pluck one out of the all the amazing sites, and paint it. It was a great way to vicariously enjoy the experience of the hike, without walking 20 miles a day. Current Paintings Right now (September 2016) I am painting 30 paintings in 30 days. With all these photos I am looking through, and really studying one scene as I paint it, I really feel as if I know the whole coast. In fact, I had a new experience this week. While at the doctor’s office I was staring at the photos of the coast on the waiting room wall. I realized that I knew where every one of the was taken! I really have experienced this whole hike, through painting. Select a painting for yourself at my website. The series Oregon Coast Trail is listed under Paintings of Oregon.  Let me know what you think! Are you enjoying this hike too? Follow me here: Share this...

Wolf Creek Painting

I am happy to announce that I have finished my painting “Wolf Creek”.     There is a stunningly beautiful hike along Wolf Creek in the Umpqua National Forest.  The trail follows along the creek closely and so even when you lose sight of it you can still hear it babbling by. At this point in the trail you are walking right next to it. The sunlight was almost directly over us and we could see so much light bouncing of the water, showing the bright green glow of the broad maple tree leaves, while also still feeling the dark, shady moss areas. This was an mid-October day, and the water levels were as low as they get. The gray rocks without moss are the ones that are underwater many months of the year. This is a brief moment of the life of this creek. The next week heavy rains came and the rocks were once again submerged. While creating this painting I posted many in progress photos to Instagram. If you care to follow along there you can find me the Instagram icon below. Here is a taste of what I show there: Thanks for coming along on my adventure. Remember if you want to see the paintings I finished first join my email list below. Follow me here: Share this...

Reducing Plastic Use – Grocery Store

If you read my prior blog post you know that our family recently decided to do something about all this plastic in our lives. Today I went to the grocery store. Whoa. With my eyes wide open on plastic use, boy did I notice a lot of it! Today I wanted to make some small, easy changes to get us started. There is nothing like immediate success to keep oneself motivated! My first goal was to use my reusable bags (which meant putting them in the car, and taking them into the store. Easy sounding, but this is real life folks!) My second goal was to not use plastic bags inside the store. Today I shopped at the new Winco in town. I headed into the store, went right over to the produce section, and thought, “How do I get this in my cart?” Sure, I could just gently lay it down atop my reusable bags, but then I thought the checker might kill me. A friendly produce guy showed me that they had brown bags next to the mushrooms, so I did that for the mushrooms. Then I grabbed a few extra bags. I headed over to carrots. There were baby carrots in plastic, large carrots in plastic, a ton of juicing carrots in (you guessed it) plastic….I spied the organic section a bit further down and found some loose carrots. Success! I threw them in the brown bag. I grabbed some zucchini, into a brown bag. I found avocado and thought, “Hey, these are already wrapped!” and put them in the cart sans bag. I put the cilantro and...

Plastic Salad? What happened here?

Why does my salad look like a bunch of plastic bags? This was the thought that rolled into my mind as I made my lunch. I’ve become more aware lately of how much plastic is creeping into our lives. I am great with plastic when it is truly needed for the job, like medical supplies. But this is just getting ridiculous. I looked down at my salad. The kale I had removed from a plastic bag. The celery and carrots were still in their respective bags. My cutting board is plastic. And to think that on our block we seem to have the smallest amount of trash on our curb during trash day. What is going on here? Why I’m Not So Keen on Plastic Plastic items take 450-1000 years to breakdown. As they aren’t make of organic material, they don’t really “decompose.” Imagine if Van Gogh had drunk water one day out of a plastic bottle, that bottle would still be around. Yikes! Glass can do a lot of the jobs that plastic does, and it can be recycled endlessly! There are a few “garbage patches” in the Pacific Ocean. Basically these are areas that have a LOT of garbage floating in the ocean. Due to ocean currents all the garbage ends of condensed in an area. Not good for any fishes, birds or other marine life that is looking for a snack and eats the plastic instead. Or gets caught and trapped in it. Our family is going to change. A little here, and a little there. Reducing Plastic Use. Grow our own vegetables this summer. We have a...

Gardening: Spring is Sprouting

Gardening: Spring is Sprouting My onions are sprouting and I have begun transplanting them into the new garden. I love onions and put them in just about everything I cook. Unfortunately I can’t remember which flat is the red onions and which one is the white. But that is a problem that will solve itself, right? (A toddler decided to play with my seedling tags, any guesses who that was?) My girls and I have planted two different kinds of peas so far. When I read the package I realized they are shorter peas, so my mental picture of the great-pea-and-bean-fort-of-2016 will probably have to wait until next year. I love reusing old egg cartoons to start my seedlings. Transplanting them into the bed gets a little wobbly so perhaps I’ll try putting them into egg shells propped up in the egg cartoon next time. I’ve also direct sowed bok choy, spinach, two kinds of carrots, green onions, artichokes (I have no idea what will happen there!) and two kinds of lettuce. Of course I forgot to mark which one was where, figuring “I’ll remember”. Um, yep, not so much. I guess I’ll turn it into a vegetable identification moment with my oldest daughter. My youngest daughter has discovered the joys of the watering can and will water anything. Including what you don’t want watered, like the driveway. Overall we are on our way to being able to get food we’ve grown ourselves. It is important to me to teach my kiddos where food comes from, the joys of gardening, working to get something you want and to have super...

About Canvas and What You Should Know Before You Buy!

My Love Affair with Canvas is Back On! For the last few months you may have noticed that I have been painting on wood panels. I have been exploring options after switching from oil to acrylic paints. I have missed canvas and decided with my last order of art supplies (I miss having a local art store!) to order all canvas. There is a certain glee I get with owning a roll of canvas. It dates back to the time I went with my high school art teacher to the art store and bought an entire roll of canvas and then got to unroll the whole thing down the school hallway. Pre-Stretched verses Artist-Stretched Canvas There are many pre-stretched canvas options for artists. I prefer to avoid these options unless I am buying it in person and can do a close inspection of the corners, make sure the canvas is taut, there are no dents, and make sure there is no warping. I would say only a 5% of the time have I bought pre-stretched. I also prefer to have heavy-duty stretcher bars and pre-made often use a lower quality stretcher bar. My worst canvas pet-peeve is staples on the side of the stretcher bars. Why? It forces you, the owner of the painting, to frame it instead of leaving you the option to show the sides of the canvas and just hang it on your wall. Some artists paint the sides with the image and many times printers give you this option. This is often called “gallery wrap,” but really gallery wrap used to mean that the canvas...

Endangered Plants – Threatened by the LNG Pipeline

Edit March 11, 2016: The Jordan Cove LNG terminal project has been rejected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission! This beautiful flower is an endangered species called the “Gentner’s Fritillary”. It lives here in Oregon and is one of four endangered species that will be “adversely affected by the pipeline” according to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. There are currently only 1,200 plants in existence. The “pipeline” is the Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) 36″ wide, 232 mile pipe that will transport Canadian and Rocky Mountain LNG (from fracking) across Oregon and to a port in Coos Bay for exportation. The pipeline is scheduled to go under two major rivers (the Klamath and the Rogue)! Construction of the pipeline would impact approximately 4,523 acres of vegetation. This would consist of 2,882 acres of forested lands, 643 acres of grasslands/shrublands, 103 acres of wetland/riparian areas, and 896 acres of agricultural areas. Of the forested land crossed, about 821 acres of late-successional old-growth, 821 acres of mid-seral, and 1,240 acres of clear-cut or regenerating forests would be impacted.  (FERC report) The “Pacific Connector” is require to develop a “Federally-Listed Plant Conservation Plan” to address the 4 critically endangered species that it could potentially eliminate. I have been unable to find the Conservation Plan. If anyone knows anything about this plan please let me know. My assumption is that they are still trying to create one. Let’s make sure it actually happens! See a map of the proposed pipeline according to the Pacific Connector website: http://pacificconnectorgp.com/maps/   Follow me here: Share this...

Archival? How to tell if a painting is archival, what that means, and what you can do to protect your art investment.

How to tell if a painting is archival, what that means, and what you can do to protect your art investment. No one wants their beautiful relationship to dissolve into a mess before their eyes. You’ve fallen in love with a painting by an artist whose work is new to you. Will it last the test of time? How can you tell if it is archival? While nothing is guaranteed in this life, there are some simple questions to ask to get an idea of how “archival” a work may be. Before we get started a quick note about the term “archival.” It really should be more along the lines of “durable.” It has nothing to do with archives, except the fact that it might stick around in one for awhile… When we speak of archival supplies and techniques we really mean that the work will last a reasonable amount of time. We are always looking to see if the work will last longer than we do. My personal minimum goal is for my paintings to last over a hundred years. Oil Paintings Most of the older paintings you see in you see in an art museum are oil. (Acrylic painting didn’t come around until the mid 20th century.)  In oil paint the pigment is held together and turned from powder to a thick liquid with oil (linseed oil, poppy seed oil, safflower oil and walnut oil being the common choices). Over the years oil paint has been developed to hold up better over time. In the beginning of new oil colors development you see unstable colors and reactions, such...