kristen@kristenoneillart.com

Trails Change

There are things that we take for granted in this life. (Everything?) Perhaps one of those things is that we think the trail we’ve been down a thousand times will be there again tomorrow. And another is the opposite. That the trail we’ve been putting off will wait for us. I painted the Oregon Coast Trail series as a way to vicariously go on the hike. I still intend to go, just not all 382 miles at once. But, just like the Appalachian Trail or the Pacific Crest Trail – trails change. How many spots that I painted will I be able to see? And they will be a different experience either way – different lighting, and weather, and perhaps season. At Ecola State Park there have been mudslides and trail changes. Will I ever see the view I painted? Treasure your moments. (Click on the image below to see the full painting) Ecola State Park Follow me here: Share this...

Oregon Coast Trail series

For years I have been painting hikes. My new series, Oregon Coast Trail, a small step in a new direction of painting a hike that I didn’t take. My hiking buddy, Pete Miller, hiked the entire 382 mile trail in 21 days this summer. (Wow, right?) As he hiked he sent me photos. The First Part of the Series In my first set of paintings I painted as he hike. Everyday I opened up my email to find a new set of photos, I’d pluck one out of the all the amazing sites, and paint it. It was a great way to vicariously enjoy the experience of the hike, without walking 20 miles a day. Current Paintings Right now (September 2016) I am painting 30 paintings in 30 days. With all these photos I am looking through, and really studying one scene as I paint it, I really feel as if I know the whole coast. In fact, I had a new experience this week. While at the doctor’s office I was staring at the photos of the coast on the waiting room wall. I realized that I knew where every one of the was taken! I really have experienced this whole hike, through painting. Select a painting for yourself at my website. The series Oregon Coast Trail is listed under Paintings of Oregon.  Let me know what you think! Are you enjoying this hike too? Follow me here: Share this...

Wolf Creek Painting

I am happy to announce that I have finished my painting “Wolf Creek”.     There is a stunningly beautiful hike along Wolf Creek in the Umpqua National Forest.  The trail follows along the creek closely and so even when you lose sight of it you can still hear it babbling by. At this point in the trail you are walking right next to it. The sunlight was almost directly over us and we could see so much light bouncing of the water, showing the bright green glow of the broad maple tree leaves, while also still feeling the dark, shady moss areas. This was an mid-October day, and the water levels were as low as they get. The gray rocks without moss are the ones that are underwater many months of the year. This is a brief moment of the life of this creek. The next week heavy rains came and the rocks were once again submerged. While creating this painting I posted many in progress photos to Instagram. If you care to follow along there you can find me the Instagram icon below. Here is a taste of what I show there: Thanks for coming along on my adventure. Remember if you want to see the paintings I finished first join my email list below. Follow me here: Share this...

Endangered Plants – Threatened by the LNG Pipeline

Edit March 11, 2016: The Jordan Cove LNG terminal project has been rejected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission! This beautiful flower is an endangered species called the “Gentner’s Fritillary”. It lives here in Oregon and is one of four endangered species that will be “adversely affected by the pipeline” according to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. There are currently only 1,200 plants in existence. The “pipeline” is the Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) 36″ wide, 232 mile pipe that will transport Canadian and Rocky Mountain LNG (from fracking) across Oregon and to a port in Coos Bay for exportation. The pipeline is scheduled to go under two major rivers (the Klamath and the Rogue)! Construction of the pipeline would impact approximately 4,523 acres of vegetation. This would consist of 2,882 acres of forested lands, 643 acres of grasslands/shrublands, 103 acres of wetland/riparian areas, and 896 acres of agricultural areas. Of the forested land crossed, about 821 acres of late-successional old-growth, 821 acres of mid-seral, and 1,240 acres of clear-cut or regenerating forests would be impacted.  (FERC report) The “Pacific Connector” is require to develop a “Federally-Listed Plant Conservation Plan” to address the 4 critically endangered species that it could potentially eliminate. I have been unable to find the Conservation Plan. If anyone knows anything about this plan please let me know. My assumption is that they are still trying to create one. Let’s make sure it actually happens! See a map of the proposed pipeline according to the Pacific Connector website: http://pacificconnectorgp.com/maps/   Follow me here: Share this...

Little River at the Wolf Creek Trailhead

The Umpqua National Forest is an easy place to find inspiration. It is also a very large place. Feeling somewhat inadequate in my ability to find a kid-friendly, supremely beautiful hike, complete with waterfall, I went on a hike with a group of folks who know the area well. An especially nice man named Pete, seems to know every trail in Southern Oregon. Pete promised us “the most beautiful hike in Southern Oregon” and he didn’t disappoint. This spot I have painted is right at the beginning of the trail. Here we get to see the Little River at the Wolf Creek Trailhead from above, as it flows under a foot bridge that we stand on. The drought has revealed the contoured bedrock under the river. Bright white rock is shaded by the tall mountains very close to the river. The afternoon sun falls across the rocks and reflects the bright blue sky. Pete stated that he’d never seen the river so low and after our hike we returned and all stood around and took in this scene. It was a striking look, but one that made you almost feel guilty for appreciating the beauty made by the drought. Want to see it in person? Check out the brochure for more info on the Wolf Creek Trail! If you want more information about this painting click here.   Follow me here: Share this...