kristen@kristenoneillart.com

Selling A Piece of Me

“Do you find it hard to sell your art? An extension of you!” This was a question I received from a fellow artist last week. When we, the artists, spend so much time, energy and creative juices bringing forth a new work, I can understand where this question comes from. For some of us, this act of creation can feel similar to connections we make with our children or our pets. At first I did struggle emotionally with selling my art. Then a few wonderful things happened to me: I sold two paintings to a couple during a group exhibition in Omaha. I was married at the time, and my husband got laid off for a month. I used the sales of the paintings to pay the mortgage payment. That felt great. Then something even better happened. After the exhibition I arranged to drop off the paintings to the buyers. They invited me into their home. They showed me where they planned to hang the paintings. Then brought out the paint samples. They were going to repaint their living room to best show off the work! Then they explained that purchasing the art was the first major purchase that they made in building their new life together. Not only was my art to decorate their home, it was to kick off their new home together.  I consider this such an honor. In college I painted, “A Road to Home” while completely homesick. It features a mountain road going through the Coastal Redwoods. A wonderful woman bought this piece for her husband upon his retirement. He had worked for the Forest Service for 30 years and...

8 Steps to Build a Straight Frame – When Your Painting Isn’t

Occasionally you will have a slightly crooked painting. Perhaps it wasn’t constructed right, or in my case the stretcher bars moved slightly while I was stretched the canvas. Normally you could cut your frame pieces simply by measuring each side of the painting. But, you don’t want to continue the crookedness. Here is how I solve this problem when making a wood frame: Lay the painting down flat – paint side up. Cut one corner’s worth of wood that you are framing – this should give you two pieces with 45 degree angles cut. In my example I am working with the upper left corner. Use a corner miter clamp to make sure that your angle is “square.” If you don’t have a clamp, you can fashion one of your own, but you will consistently need to check that it is still square in all the following steps. Put the corresponding corner of the painting in to that corner of the frame as flush as you can get. Lay out the other two boards (in this case the right and the bottom). Make the other three corners square (right angles). When all 4 corners are square you will find gaps between the painting and the wooden frame. (These gaps wouldn’t normally exist on a square painting.) Measure how large you have to make each length of the frame to have it compensate for the gaps. Follow me here: Share this...