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Oregon Coast Trail series

For years I have been painting hikes. My new series, Oregon Coast Trail, a small step in a new direction of painting a hike that I didn’t take. My hiking buddy, Pete Miller, hiked the entire 382 mile trail in 21 days this summer. (Wow, right?) As he hiked he sent me photos. The First Part of the Series In my first set of paintings I painted as he hike. Everyday I opened up my email to find a new set of photos, I’d pluck one out of the all the amazing sites, and paint it. It was a great way to vicariously enjoy the experience of the hike, without walking 20 miles a day. Current Paintings Right now (September 2016) I am painting 30 paintings in 30 days. With all these photos I am looking through, and really studying one scene as I paint it, I really feel as if I know the whole coast. In fact, I had a new experience this week. While at the doctor’s office I was staring at the photos of the coast on the waiting room wall. I realized that I knew where every one of the was taken! I really have experienced this whole hike, through painting. Select a painting for yourself at my website. The series Oregon Coast Trail is listed under Paintings of Oregon.  Let me know what you think! Are you enjoying this hike too? Follow me here: Share this...

Influence: Neil Welliver

In the days before I knew I was a landscape painter I encountered Neil Welliver’s work. It is difficult to say to what exact degree his work influenced me, but my interaction with his large landscapes of Maine was the first time that I really thought about landscapes possible role in post-modern art. Now, one of my life goals is to explore what landscape painting can mean and to challenge the traditional concept of landscape painting and how we see landscape in our own lives. Neil Welliver is most famous for his landscape paintings of Maine. This, predictably, is the work that I am most connected to of his and the work I stumbled upon when it came to the Cabrillo College Gallery in 2000. It is always an amazing difference between seeing a work through media verses your own eyes. There’s a presence and a sense of color that just doesn’t exist the same way. With Welliver’s large format paintings there’s also a confrontation that happens while face to face with one. Welliver himself spoke of the aggression. But really, my interest in painting lies in the fact of the painting. And I think that’s why sometimes people find the big paintings uncomfortable. Because they, in fact, perceive the space, sense it, and at the same time are repelled by the aggression of the painting, of the pigment, of the fact of the picture, its size. And it’s the same in the small ones. It’s absolutely the same in the small paintings, it’s just that it is less aggressive, easier to digest there. People who object to my...

Influence: Katsushika Hokusai

Best known for: The Great Wave of Kanagawa, 36 Views of Mount Fuji When I was little I thought I knew a secret: that Japanese art from the Edo period is wonderful. Hokusai’s 36 Views of Mount Fuji is a very well known series, and The Great Wave off Kanagawa is the most recognizable and reproduced piece. I first encountered this piece as a young girl inside a Japanese restaurant. It was printed across two pieces of cloth that were hanging over a doorway. It was love at first sight. Over the years Hokusai has remained my favorite. Once while cutting through the Art Institute of Chicago (a common student practice for SAIC students looking for a break from the cold), I looked over and stopped dead in my tracks. There were the 36 Views of Mount Fuji just twenty feet away! I later stood in that exact spot and looked at where they hung and I am not sure how I even saw them from that angle. At that moment they jumped out and grabbed me. I hurried over through the intricate maze of museum walls in the Asian wing and arrived before them. They were so small. I couldn’t believe it (they’re approximately 10” x 15”). I stood there for an hour. I returned over and over, always finding new moments with these pieces. When I said goodbye before the show closed it was with tears in my eyes. Luckily, these wonderful artworks are prints so there are many copies and many chances to see them. There was a different perspective in traditional Japanese art. The art shows a...